Open Book

ANNA L. HINTON

Assistant Professor, UNT

 

BIO

Dr. Hinton specializes in 20th and 21st century African American literature and literature of the African diaspora. Her current book-in-progress, Refusing to Be Made Whole: Disability in Contemporary Black Women’s Writing, merges Black feminist and critical disability studies theories and methodologies to articulate how contemporary Black women writers present becoming disabled as a traumatic and violent aspect of Black womanhood on one hand, but nevertheless embrace this relationship in order to imagine personal and communal healing, on the other.  She teaches courses such as Race, Gender, and Disability in Contemporary Black Literature and Popular Culture and The Black Posthuman: Race, Medicine, and Technology in Contemporary Speculative Fiction.  She has contributed to the collection Toni Morrison: On Mothers and Motherhood and has published in The Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies (JLCDS) and The College Language Association Journal (CLAJ).

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SCHOLARLY WORK

Articles, Books and Chapters

Workspace

“AND SO I BUST BACK: VIOLENCE, RACE, AND DISABILITY IN HIP HOP”

What do we miss when we focus on Black death and deathly violence when considering Black masculinity? Disability. In this piece, I argue that hip-hop artists express bodily and psychic vulnerability in ways that society often misses, often because as soon as this vulnerability is evoked it is masked by fantasies of violence.

Traditional Library

“MAKING DO WITH WHAT YOU DON’T HAVE: DISABLED BLACK MOTHERHOOD IN OCTAVIA
BUTLER’S PARABLE OF THE SOWER AND PARABLE OF THE TALENTS”

What knowledge is gleaned from motherwork performed by Black disabled other/mothers? This article turns to Octavia E. Butler's Parable duology to argue though society constructs Black mothers as "bad" by birthing disabled children, Butler casts disabled Black motherwork as a key to survival and community building.

Researching and Writing

The medical community and the police are in cahoots against Black bodies...at least in Assata Shakur's memoir. In this article, I reveal that Shakur's memoir about her political awakening and time incarcerated is as much about her experience as a patient as it is political prisoner. Her Blackness makes her perceived as dangerous when in fact she is incredibly vulnerable. Her disabled and ill body bears witness to this vulnerability and her innocence.

 

COURSES

Knowledge for Every Level

School LIbrary
Focused mixed race woman wearing headpho

RACE, GENDER, AND DISABILITY IN LITERATURE AND POP-CULTURE

Spring 2021

In this course, we think critically about cultural products we consume using feminist, queer, critical race, and disability studies. Particularly, I want us to identify and critically engage moments where race, gender, and dis/ability converge to challenge our experience of Black culture. For example, What does it mean for hip-hop artist Joe Budden to exhort more rappers to discuss mental health? Or, for self-pronounced "Mother of Black Hollywood," Jennifer Lewis, to come out as having bipolar and write a memoir about her experiences? How do we read Bebe Moore Campbell's 72 Hour Hold, a novel about a Black mother struggling to access help for her mentally disabled daughter, in light of Campbell's own daughter, actress Maia Campbell's, very public fall-out due to her mental disability? This course reads cultural and literary texts such as music lyrics, poetry, celebrity memoir, and novels, to delve into issues and problems such as the role of stereotypes, shame, and stigma in our interpretation of Black culture and understandings of Black celebrity persona. We will also critically discuss mass consumption of Black pain and unpack the problems and paradoxes in narratives of "overcoming."

BLACK LIT IN THE HIP-HOP YEARS

Spring 2020

What the hell happened after the U.S. passed the Civil Rights of Act of 1964?! To be clear: the gains of the civil rights movements of the 1950s and 1960s created an unprecedented level of opportunity and protection for marginalized groups; however, the decades that followed were marked, for far too many, by violence, drugs, and abject poverty.  Yet, those most harmed by these conditions were responsible for the ingenious innovation in art, dance, and music that we now recognize as the explosion of hip-hop culture.   

 In this course, we will listen to the voices and dive into the history, literature, and music of the mid-1970s to the late 1990s to study the movement that rocked the world. 

I am committed to creating a course that is inclusive in its design. If you encounter barriers, please let me know immediately so we can determine if there is a design adjustment that can be made. I am happy to consider creative solutions as long as they do not compromise the intent of the assessment or learning activity.

If you are a student with a disability, or think you may have a disability, you are also welcome to initiate this conversation with Katy Washington of Office of Disability Access. The Office of Disability Access works with students with disabilities and faculty members to identify reasonable accommodations. Please visit their website for contact and other information: https://disability.unt.edu/ (Links to an external site.). If you have already been approved for accommodations through the Office of Accessible Education, please meet with me so we can develop an implementation plan together.

Empty Chairs in Lecture Room

VAMPIRES, VERMIN, & VIXENS: RACE, MEDICINE, AND TECHNOLOGY IN CONTEMPORARY SPECULATIVE FICTION

Summer 2020

Who gets to be human? What groups of people have never been considered human? How do advances in medicine and technology both maintain and blur the lines of this division? What does it mean to reject the human category altogether, particularly for members of marginalized groups designated as non-human? 


We were never human--asserts critical race scholar Alexander Weheliye, as he briefly overviews lineages of Black writing on humanism and posthumanism. The problem, according to Weheliye and other critics, is that Blackness has been excised from our current, liberal definitions of the “human.” The concept/figure/trope of the posthuman actually represents a space of possibility for Black intellectuals and creators. In the class, we will read short stories, novellas, and novels of Black/Afro/African futurism and speculative fiction alongside critical essays to question, examine, contest, and explore concepts of the human and posthuman by way of conversations around disability, Blackness, medicine, and technology.

 

GET IN TOUCH

University of North Texas
Department of English
1401 W Hickory St, 
Denton, TX 76201

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