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ANNA LAQUAWN HINTON

Assistant Professor
English Department
UNT

 

ABOUT ME

Dr. Anna LaQuawn Hinton is an Assistant professor of Disability Studies and Black Literature & Culture in the English Department at the University of North Texas. Her research interests include contemporary Black women’s writing, Black feminist theory, critical disability studies, crip theory, reproductive justice, and hip hop studies, to name a few. She is currently writing her monograph, Refusing to Be Made Whole: Disability in Contemporary Black Women's Writing, which approaches conversations about aesthetics, spirituality, representation, community, sexuality, motherhood, and futurity through a Black feminist disability studies perspective. Her work is published or forthcoming in Toni Morrison: On Mothers and Motherhood, CLA Journal (CLAJ), the Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies (JLCDS), and The Cambridge Companion to American Literature and the Body. She teaches courses on contemporary Black Literature and Culture and Critical Disability Studies that explore Afro-Futurism, Hip Hop and Hip Hop Feminism, Black Queer and Trans Studies, Crip-of-Color Critique, Black Sexuality Studies, and more. She is also Public Relations Director for The College Language Association and Book Review Editor for Studies in the Novel, as well as a member of the Committee for Persons with Disabilities for the City of Denton (Texas). She is currently the Faculty in Residence in the honors dorm at UNT where she lives with her wife, daughter, dog, cat, tortoise, and a bearded dragon.

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SCHOLARLY WORK

Articles, Books and Chapters

Workspace

“AND SO I BUST BACK: VIOLENCE, RACE, AND DISABILITY IN HIP HOP”

What do we miss when we focus on Black death and deathly violence when considering Black masculinity? Disability. In this piece, I argue that hip-hop artists express bodily and psychic vulnerability in ways that society often misses, often because as soon as this vulnerability is evoked it is masked by fantasies of violence.

Traditional Library

“MAKING DO WITH WHAT YOU DON’T HAVE: DISABLED BLACK MOTHERHOOD IN OCTAVIA
BUTLER’S PARABLE OF THE SOWER AND PARABLE OF THE TALENTS”

What knowledge is gleaned from motherwork performed by Black disabled other/mothers? This article turns to Octavia E. Butler's Parable duology to argue though society constructs Black mothers as "bad" by birthing disabled children, Butler casts disabled Black motherwork as a key to survival and community building.

Researching and Writing

The medical community and the police are in cahoots against Black bodies...at least in Assata Shakur's memoir. In this article, I reveal that Shakur's memoir about her political awakening and time incarcerated is as much about her experience as a patient as it is political prisoner. Her Blackness makes her perceived as dangerous when in fact she is incredibly vulnerable. Her disabled and ill body bears witness to this vulnerability and her innocence.

 

COURSES

FALL 2022

Learn More

INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY DISABILITY STUDIES 

8/29/2022 - 12/16/2022

What is disability studies? What does it mean to identify as disabled? How has feminist, LBGTQIA+, and Black movements influenced and shaped movements for disability right? How can disability studies expand our readings of the American literary canon? In this course, will examine these questions through an in-depth study of the foundations of literary disability studies including defining keywords in the field such as the medical and social models of disability, engaging foundational and new theoretical texts in the field, and reading the fictive and autobiographical works of writers of disability such as William Faulker, Octavia Butler, Flannery O’Connor, Ernest Hemmingway, Toni Morrison, Audre Lorde, and Alice Walker.

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STUDIES IN CONTEMPORARY AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE AND CULTURE: INTRODUCING BLACK DISABILITY STUDIES

8/29/2022 - 12/16/2022

The COVID-19 pandemic has revealed our capacity to implement practices that make the world more accessible to those who inhabit a variety of bodyminds even as our failure to adequately respond to this crisis has created a populous of people that are newly debilitated due to the long-term changes in function and capacity after contracting the COVID virus. While middle and upper-class members of society–abled-bodied and disabled alike, but especially able-bodied– have greatly benefited from practices and policies that promote accessibility, those who are most vulnerable in society–poor, already disabled Black and Indigenous people as well as other people of color–have had to contend with greater barriers to accessibility and the debilitating effects of long-COVID. And yet, people who experience socio-economic precarity, racial and sexual othering, and political disenfranchisement are quite familiar with how our society creates debility in certain bodyminds. Disabled people are intimately familiar with navigating inaccessible spaces. We’ll talk more about this as I introduce you to the field of literary and cultural disability studies with a special focus on Black studies and feminist theoretical interventions. By engaging writings by scholars, artists, and activists like Sami Schalk, Alice Walker, and Vilissa Thompson, you’ll gain the theoretical, critical, and historical foundation to approach literary and cultural works, as well as our current socio-political landscape in this pandemic, through a lens that takes into consideration the intersecting issues of dis/ability, race, class, gender, nationality, and sexuality.

 

GET IN TOUCH

University of North Texas
Department of English
1401 W Hickory St, 
Denton, TX 76201

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